wafflesjr:

WATCH IT

oneforthewinter:

thedapperproject:

Photographer Mattias Klum from National Geographic

Chills.

"The gift of a mixtape was very personal. Often they were made for exactly one person, no one else. A radio program with one listener. Each song, carefully chosen, with love and humor, as if to say, “This is who I am, and by this tape you will know me better.” The song choice and sequence allowed the giver to say what one might be too shy to say outright. The songs contained on a mixtape from a lover were scrutinized carefully for clues and metaphors that might reveal the nuances and deeper meanings secreted in the emotional cargo. Other people’s music—ordered and collected in infinitely imaginative ways—became a new form of expression."
How Music Works, David Byrne (via beckhansn)

theimpalaslovechild:

and in that moment, everyone’s heart broke.

"privileged kids go to counseling, poor kids go to jail."
judge mathis, speaking the truth (via spring1999)

mulerone:

Hulk is tired of your shit

nprfreshair:

Here’s Hari Kondabolu on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell in a segment he refers to in his recent interview on Fresh Air. 

Kondabolu comments on the National Spelling Bee, or as he likes to call it, “the Indian Super Bowl.” 

nprfreshair:

Before pursuing stand-up comedy full-time, Hari Kondabolu was a human rights activist. At first telling jokes was a cathartic release from the intense work he did with victims of hate crimes and workplace discrimination. In today’s interview he recounts how he began to incorporate aspects of his work into his comedy: 

"I used to do a bit where I used to read the U.S. citizenship application onstage. I think that’s part of just being overeducated and wanting to do document analysis, but I’d actually bring it on stage and read questions. Because for people who don’t know, this is what immigrants have to go through to gain status in this country and it’s absurd and it’s something we take for granted as American citizens.
Sometimes that was hard in a club on a Friday night and it’s 10 o-clock and everyone’s drunk and there’s a dude on stage reading a form, it’s a strange thing to read a government form in front of a bunch of drunk people.”


Hari’s new comedy album is called Waiting for 2042. 
Photo by Kyle Johnson

nprfreshair:

Before pursuing stand-up comedy full-time, Hari Kondabolu was a human rights activist. At first telling jokes was a cathartic release from the intense work he did with victims of hate crimes and workplace discrimination. In today’s interview he recounts how he began to incorporate aspects of his work into his comedy: 

"I used to do a bit where I used to read the U.S. citizenship application onstage. I think that’s part of just being overeducated and wanting to do document analysis, but I’d actually bring it on stage and read questions. Because for people who don’t know, this is what immigrants have to go through to gain status in this country and it’s absurd and it’s something we take for granted as American citizens.

Sometimes that was hard in a club on a Friday night and it’s 10 o-clock and everyone’s drunk and there’s a dude on stage reading a form, it’s a strange thing to read a government form in front of a bunch of drunk people.”

Hari’s new comedy album is called Waiting for 2042

Photo by Kyle Johnson

Forever (Haim Cover)
James Bay

themusiclibrary:

Forever (Haim Cover) | James Bay

Gooey
Glass Animals

sisterwives:

Glass Animals - Gooey

"According to the UN only 25 per cent of women with disabilities are in the global workforce.
Literacy rates for women with disabilities globally may be as low as one per cent.
Mortality rates among girls with disabilities are much higher than for boys.
Women with disabilities face significantly more difficulties in attaining access to adequate housing, health, education, vocational training & employment, & are more likely to be institutionalized. They also experience inequality in hiring, promotion & equal pay, access to training & retraining, credit & other productive resources.
According to the UN disabled women rarely participate in economic decision making."